Father’s Day Goodies for All!

    June 17, 2017

    In this newsletter:

    Dear ones,

    It’s spring, and this is Father’s Day weekend! To celebrate, I made my cool and tasty pasta primavera salad. Here’s the recipe with wine pairing suggestions. I hope you and your father, or whoever you choose to share it with, enjoy!


    Killer Sale on JUST THE WAY YOU ARE!

    Is it a sale if it’s free??? Thanks to the folks at BookBub, for a limited time, the eBook of JUST THE WAY YOU ARE (enhanced with bonus material!) is free in eBook on Kindle, Kobo, iBooks and Nook! If you’ve already read the Lost Hearts series, consider sharing the sale with friends who enjoy contemporary suspense.

    JUST THE WAY YOU ARE: A Lost Hearts Full-Length Contemporary, stars Zack Givens, one of the most arrogant heroes I’ve ever written, and Hope Prescott, who cuts him down to size.


          The voice on the other end of the phone said, “Griswald, what are you doing at Mr. Givens’s office?”
          Caller ID had informed her where he was. So tell her the truth. Tell her that he was not Zack Givens’s butler. He was Zack Givens himself.
          In a saucy tone, Hope asked, “Does the old fart want you to answer the door to his office?”
          Her audacity struck him dumb. Tell her the truth? Hell, he was going to fire her.
          She must have sensed something in his indrawn breath, for she said, “I’m sorry, that was rude. You’re loyal to Mr. Givens, and I shouldn’t test your loyalty. Do you want his messages?”
          Glumly, Zack realized he couldn’t fire her. Right now, she was the only friend he had. “No.”
          “Then what can I do for you?”
          In a doleful tone, he confessed, “I’ve got a cold.”
          “Poor baby.” Her voice shook with amusement, but beneath that was a wealth of sympathy.
          Zack bathed in its warmth. “And my secretary just quit.”
          “You have a secretary?”
          Her surprise made him remember. She thought he was Griswald. So he improvised, “The position of butler holds a lot of responsibility.”
          “It must.” She sounded impressed. “Why did she quit?”
          “She was inefficient.” The snarl was back in his tone.
          “Hmm, sounds like you’re cranky.”
          “Of course I’m cranky!” Then he realized — that was the word used to describe babies.
          Hope was making fun of him.

    Fun fact—in the movie The Manchurian Candidate, Denzel Washington buys a copy of JUST THE WAY YOU ARE. As you can see, the book is clearly visible. Yes, he buys it…and you can have it free in eBook for Kindle, Kobo, iBooks and Nook. Get your copy now!

    Continue the Lost Hearts series with ALMOST LIKE BEING IN LOVE, and CLOSE TO YOU (the eBooks are enhanced with bonus material,) and the Christmas short story, GABRIEL’S GIFT.


    Read THE WOMAN WHO COULDN’T SCREAM early!

    Reminder: my publisher is running a Goodreads contest for 100 paper advanced reading copies of my Virtue Falls hardcover, THE WOMAN WHO COULDN’T SCREAM, out September 5. The contest ends June 27, so enter now!


    Father’s Day Story

    Since tomorrow is Father’s Day, I want to share a little something about my father. I never met him (he died before I was born,) but I knew Wesley Dodd was a printer, someone who worked on newspapers. Then a family member sent me this clipping and I realized he also wrote articles as a reporter. So I got the desire & the writing talent from the father I never met. How cool is that?

    That’s why, on the VIRTUE FALLS Readers’ Guide, one question is: “Like her father, Elizabeth is dedicated to the study of geology & the changes in the earth despite being raised by her aunt & uncle. How much of our personalities/interests are formed by our DNA/ancestors? Do you find family members comparing you to a relative you’ve never known?”

    Happy Father’s Day, and—do you find family members comparing you to a relative you’ve never known?

    Warmly,
    Christina Dodd

    “When I was a boy of 14, my father was so ignorant, I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be 21, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years.” — Mark Twain


Read my inline content